Marketing Eye

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Marketing Eye magazine is now complete and will soon hit stands and be available online. It took almost six months to get it publishing ready and was a long hard process, but after losing a bit more hair, it was well worth the hard work.

In creating this issue, I have learnt a great deal about marketing, about the client services sector and about staying the course, even when the Tough Mudder founders seem to have come along and put insurmountable obstacles in my path.*
Published in Marketing
Saturday, 28 February 2015 00:00

Why job interviews are a two-way street

It's Saturday and as reluctant as Brandon Reviere and myself are to be working away in the office, we both have decided that this is what we needed to do to find the next 'Marketing Eye'.

Brandon is our incredibly talented Art Director in Atlanta and is instrumental in deciding who the two new team members in the Atlanta office are going to be.

We have done a few interviews over the past day, and there are a few things that we both would love to share.

Interviews are a two-way street

If you have taken the time to come to a job interview, be prepared. As much as you want to learn about us, we want to learn about you. "By the questions you ask, you learn more about the company and yourself than about the interviewee," says Brandon Reviere. "You find out what you want in that person and how your company presents itself."
Published in Culture
Atlanta Inside Sales Executive Tayler Bridger is a complete rockstar.

Month one of her newly appointed inside sales position in the Marketing Eye Melbourne, Australia office, she has achieved a huge milestone; $128,000 worth of sales. I am thrilled. For years I have been letting sales fall to the wayside because we were not able to get back to all of the leads that came through our website. There simply were not enough hours in the day. But that changed.
Published in Marketing
This week, we did something we never do. We stopped. 

If you ever ask a former employee about what it is like to work for Marketing Eye, they always say that there is never a moment to spare. There is always something to do. 

The nature of our business is marketing. As such, we deliver marketing strategy and campaigns for the clients we work with. If we are not executing marketing strategies, we are increasing followers for clients on social media, researching their competitors, educating ourselves on the latest marketing techniques and in general spending time surfing the internet.
Published in Marketing
Tuesday, 18 November 2014 00:00

How to 'In-sight-pool' followers on Twitter

Devon Wijesinghe is the energetic CEO of audience cultivation and conversion platform, Insightpool, an invaluable tool for large scale marketing campaigns. The company derives from the need for businesses to cultivate leads through social media engagement, and to maximize the investment of time, resources and money on existing social media engagement strategies.
Published in Marketing
We are at the pointy end of the year, and it's without doubt my most reflective period. It's 10 years since I registered the Marketing Eye business name, and it's been a long, arduous journey, but one that I don't regret.

Marketing Eye started with investment money. The first few years, we had some tweaking to do, which was stressful, because I wasn't just playing with my money. Bringing a new model into a mature market is just a case of rolling the dice, seeing how they fall and hoping for the best. But I believed in it with all of my heart. I thought I knew something that others didn't and that was that all small businesses need to manage cash flow with no surprises and they all need marketing. This is a formidable combination, capable of allowing small to medium sized businesses the freedom to do what they do, without being held to their next invoice.

There were changes that needed to occur in the business model, but the day we got it right we never looked back. In the time leading up to this moment, I doubted myself, cried myself to sleep because I felt like a failure and constantly put myself in situations where I was uncomfortable. I was stressed off my head and didn't know how to deal with it. No one taught me how to do this. Often, a simple thing that would go wrong, would seem to me like the end of the world. Once, some hackers hacked into our bank accounts and emptied them. I had a public speaking engagement only an hour later. Instead of dealing with it later, I cancelled the engagement. I didn't know what to do and I didn't have the hindsight to know that it could wait an hour or two. It was the wrong choice and something that I now realize was not how an entrepreneur acts. They are supposed to suck it up, put on their good shoes and show the world how things are done.

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I am not a born entrepreneur. In fact, I am anything but. I am more like a person who has an idea and just wants to see it through. It's like finishing a mathematics equation. I wish I could say that I had undying passion for business, but instead, I feel gratitude that I am able to provide myself with a great life, as well as the ability  to employ people and provide them with a secure income and an opportunity to see themselves shine.

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Being a woman should never be a disadvantage and I am the last to hang my hat on the entire equality equation. I believe in 'the best person for the job' regardless of gender.

But being a woman is hard. Being a single woman in her early forties who hasn't had a family yet, is even harder. You are placed in a category by people with a certain distain for you. It makes people feel sorry for you. It makes people think that there must be something wrong with you. If you haven't done it at all at least once, there must be something wrong with you mustn't there?

I am speaking from first hand experience. I am that girl. I am that woman. I am that sister. And I am that daughter. What went wrong? Was she so career-obsessed that she thought it would be around forever; that looks, availability, men and a never ending line up would stay around forever? Or is she just plain hard work?

Having done a lot of soul searching, I have found the answer: I forgot to stop and smell the roses and keep myself open to possibility.

In my case, my 30's were spent building a business -- this business, Marketing Eye. And it was spent being in love with two men and not looking elsewhere. Two that just kept the carrot dangling enough so that while I was so busy working, I had no time to look for anyone else. Instead, I had someone when I needed them and I had my business that I could dedicate my time to. One was during my early 30's, the other in my late 30's. They were narcissistic men who knew how to manipulate. I was vulnerable and weak. They were both the wrong men and twice I made the same choices. If nothing changes, nothing changes. You would think a smart woman like me would know better.

I woke up one month ago. I realized that growing a business is hard work and I have given my heart and soul to it. I also become acutely aware that I have been played by people smarter than me because I am easy prey. I am that career woman who has a dream and has so many moving parts that she will never have time to open herself up for possibility. Instead, when she catches her breath, she just wants the person who is most comfortable to her.

I am telling a story that most women would be afraid to tell. The story of how we miss things because to run a business, we not only have a vision and a plan, but we have to have the guts, determination and fearless ability to pick ourselves up off the ground over and over again when no one, and I mean no one is going to give us a hand. 

We may have family who love us; but they too think something is wrong. They can't quite figure out how we don't 'have it all'. I am someone's daughter and someone's sister. They love me like no one else is ever going to love me - unconditionally. But they too look at me and wonder what went wrong.

Every single time that I think that everything is going to work out fine and things are falling into place - something falls apart. And it's never small. It's big. It brings me to my knees and it is excruciating. Worse still, I am dealing with this by myself, internalizing the pain, the hurt and the disappointment. I know tomorrow that I have to get up and do it all over again and I have no one who is going to do it for me. I mean no one.

Being a woman in business, whether you have five children and a loving husband, or you are like me - single and not sure where you fit in the world - is challenging. 

Next time you look at that female entrepreneur that walks into the room in her designer outfit, head held high, navigating her next move; spare a thought for the fact that she has a role to play and she is doing it to the best of her ability. She will fall down, make the wrong choices and come across as if her world is perfect - but she is human, and the truth of the matter is that it isn't easy being her. It isn't easy being me.
Published in Management
I sat at my desk yesterday and I felt relieved. Something had been lifted. In Australia, we have end of financial year that keeps people like myself busy over the months of July and August, and then by the time September comes around, I always feel like I am playing catch up. Fortunately, I don't need to do this for another few months again when the US end of financial year occurs.

Business is going great. We have an phenomenal team, one of the best we have had possibly over the entire history of the business. What makes this team so great is that they are 'team workers', people that share ideas, collaborate and try to get the best out of each other. Rather than working and taking full responsibility for a client, they take it as a team effort to ensure our clients happiness.
Published in Marketing
Monday, 07 July 2014 00:00

16 Lessons I Have Learned This Year

There have been many lessons I have learned this year; some the easy way and some the hard way.

The past six months have been exhausting. It has tested me in ways that I never imagined possible and at the same time, made me realize a few things about myself that will help shape the person I am moving forward.

I have learned:

Published in Marketing
Monday, 23 June 2014 00:00

The Wolf Is Dangerous

The Wolf of Wall Street was in many people's opinions a celebration of the bad life - drugs, sex, expensive toys, opulent homes and super expensive suits.

As we watched on as Leonardo DiCaprio spruiked, "The way I look at it, their money was better off in my pocket," many of us couldn't believe that world existed quite like that. But it does. And it's right here on our doorstep too.

Published in Marketing
Friday, 16 May 2014 00:00

Ideas that are so BAD, they are good

As seen on LinkedIn:

When examining our culture at Marketing Eye, one idea usually sticks out at people; that is, our stance on bad ideas. Taking a unique approach (remembering nothing we do here is status quo), I encourage my team to share their ideas daily; the great, the good and the terrible.

Why? Because I truly believe there is value in bad ideas.

If you look in to the journey behind the biggest accomplishments in the world, they’re full of bad ideas. In fact, it’s the mishaps, the arduous trial and error procedure that leads to greatness. A bad idea simply paves the way for a new and improved one. Bad ideas are often discouraged and quickly discounted as failures, but in reality, they identify solutions.

I need my team; from the marketing managers to the interns, to feel that they have an open forum to exchange their ideas with ease; we are, after all, a creative company. And during a consultancy, our marketing managers will implore our clients to lay all of their ideas on the table. And often we find gold from the very idea our clients are hesitant to tell us.

What I know - when you shut down the idea on bad ideas, you close it on future good ones too.

Published in Culture
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