Marketing Eye

How To Write An Effective Elevator Pitch

Writing your elevator pitch can be intimidating. Trying to cram everything about your brand, what you do, why you do it, and how it can help people into 30 seconds is daunting. Don’t worry, it’s completely possible.

The basic structure is pretty easy to hammer out. Many people find it helpful to create an outline before they try and fully write out the elevator pitch. Keep the structure simple: explanation, value, and close with the “ask.”  


Explanation


If you haven’t already you need to read, explain it to a 6 year old. When you are trying to articulate your pitch you need to figure out a way to explain what your company, product, or service does in one line, yes, a single sentence. This explanation needs to be easily understood, no jargon, no business babble, something a 6 year old can understand.


Value

Your value has to explain why your listener cares about what you provide. The easiest way to provide value is to show data that demonstrates why your idea is a good idea. Data has a twofold importance. One, it helps paint a picture of what you do and two, it give you credibility. If you are just starting out and you don’t have any concrete data yet, find an example. Make sure your listener can understand how your product or service will fit into their daily lives.


Ask

The ask is a simple and basic part of your pitch but very important. If you structure your ask correctly to the right audience you can get one hell of a response. You need to figure out how to tie everything in with your listener. Think about your product or service, is there a way to bring the value into their real world. Saying things like “do you know anyone…?” or “how are you currently dealing with…?” are easy ways to get your listener to visualize themselves, or someone they know, using your product or service.

Clearly this isn’t the end all guide to Elevator Pitches but it should help you to get started building something that you can deliver. The last thing i’ll say is practice your pitch but not too much. There’s nothing worse than stumbling over your words or sounding too rehearsed. Keep it loose and always keep in mind your audience. You probably won’t want to deliver the exact same pitch to the CEO as you would the “guy on the floor.”


So...are you ready to get started? ← my ask :)


For More Information on How Marketing Eye Can Help Your Business Visit www.marketingeyeatlanta.com or call our Atlanta office at 404-626-8070








Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.